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  • Obrien Sehested posted an update 1 month, 1 week ago

    If you are planning to file for bankruptcy in the near future, don’t charge up your credit cards thinking that you won’t have to pay back the debt. In many states, there are rules about how much credit card debt and what kind, may be discharged in a bankruptcy. For instance, if you make purchases for luxury items, such as an expensive new TV, within 6 months prior to filing, you may be obligated to pay that amount back. On the other hand, if you used your credit card to purchase groceries, or other necessities, the rules may be different. Be sure to ask your attorney for advice.

    Remember you still have to pay taxes on your debts. A lot of people don’t realize that even if their debts are discharged in the bankruptcy, they are still responsible to the IRS. The IRS usually does not allow complete forgiveness, although payment plans are common. Make sure to find out what is covered and what is not.

    It is important to list all your assets and liabilities during the bankruptcy proceeding. Failure to do so will only cause you problems in the end. Whomever you use to file with must know everything there is to know about your finances, both good and bad. Don’t hold back information and create a strategy so you can deal with what’s really happening.

    Make sure that you know which,or your assets you will lose when you declare yourself bankrupt. While filing for bankruptcy may seem like a great way to clear the slate and start again with your finances, you need to understand that most of your assets will be seized during the process.

    Educate yourself about the bankruptcy process. You can increase your knowledge of the bankruptcy process by conversing with a bankruptcy attorney or by carrying out independent research on the internet. Whichever method you chose to increase your knowledge of the bankruptcy process, it is vital that you comprehend how filing for bankruptcy will affect yourself, your family and your creditors.

    Consider filing Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7, if you are facing foreclosure. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to create a restructured payment plan which includes your mortgage arrears. This will allow you to get your mortgage payments current, so that you won’t lose your home. Chapter 13 doesn’t require you to turn over property, so you don’t have to worry about the homestead exemption, either.

    Before you consider filing for bankruptcy, you should make a pre-determination if bankruptcy may be the right choice. First, make a list of all income, including, salary, child support, alimony, rent and any other sources you may have. Then, make a list of your bills. These would include mortgage, rent, car payments, monthly credit card payments, groceries and gas. If
    tax resolution specialist is more than the income you bring in, it may be time to seek the advice of a bankruptcy attorney, who can help you make the final decision.

    Be sure to consider all of your options before filing for personal bankruptcy, as there may be some you haven’t considered. If you have a job that has slowed down due to the recession, such as construction, you may need to find a new job. This could help your situation until the economy picks back up.

    Do some research. There are two main types of personal bankruptcy – Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. Chapter 7 will eliminate the majority of your debt while Chapter 13 restructures it to give you time to pay it off. Each one has different rules on what assets you are allowed to keep. So, ask a lot of questions before you decide which one is the best fit for your situation.

    Make sure that you do everything in your power to avoid bankruptcy. Avoid financial disaster and make sure that you are not going to be embarrassed around friends and family, the next time they talk about their finances and credit history. Hopefully, this article has helped you out.